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Marie Antoinette: Revolution And Death

The financial situation in France in the late 1780s was disastrous. The debts accumulated to fight wars had brought the country on the verge of bankruptcy. To make things worse, very harsh winters in 1787 and 1788 resulted in crop failure, draughts and famine. The people were starving. To attempt to pass the financial reforms

How People Spoke: The Regency Era

I’m a huge fan of Georgette Heyer’s books and one of the things I love the most about them is the way the characters talk. Heyer makes them speak just like people in the Regency era, where her stories are set, spoke and thus use words and expressions that are now forgotten or rarely used.

Sarah Wallis Bowdich’s Ship Encounters Pirates

At the beginning of the nineteenth century, English ladies rarely travelled abroad, let alone sail to Africa with their baby daughters to meet their husbands. But that’s exactly was Sarah Wallis Bowdich (1791-1856) did (only to discover that her husband had briefly returned to England!, and their poor daughter fell ill and died in Africa,

The Birth of Madame Royale

After eight years of marriage, Marie Antoinette gave birth to her first child. Hundreds of courtiers were present at the birth. At the time at Versailles, Queens and princesses of the blood were required to give birth in public to prevent the baby being swapped and thus compromising the succession should he (French laws only

Book Review: Venetia by Georgette Heyer

Synopsis:In all her twenty-five years, lovely Venetia Lanyon has never been further than Harrongate, nor enjoyed the attentions of any but her two wearisomely persistent suitors. Then, in one extraordinary encounter, she meets a neighbour she only knows by reputation – the infamous Lord Damerel – and before she realizes it, finds herself egging on

Sheridan Canvasses At Westminster

One of my favourite pastimes is to read old magazines (yes, I’m weird like that, but they are much more interesting than modern magazines really) and, while perusing the August 1818 edition of La Belle AssemblĂ©e, I stumbled upon a fun episode involving Mr Sheridan canvassing for an election. It made me chuckle so I

Patrick Bronte

Patrick Bronte was born at Emdale, in Ireland, on 17th March 1777. A tall and slim man with red hair, Patrick was the eldest of 10 children of Hugh Brunty, an agricultural labourer, and his wife Eleanor (also called Alice) McClory. His family was poor and initially, he was apprenticed to a blacksmith and then

Giving Birth While Travelling, in 1818

Giving birth in the nineteenth century was a harrowing and painful experience. Women would just give birth at home, assisted only by a midwife or more commonly at this time by a physician. There were no hospitals, no drugs to ease the pain and the risk of dying was very high. Now imagine going through