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47 Washington’s Maxims

1. Every action in company ought to be with some sign of respect to those present. 2. In the presence of others sing not to yourself with a humming voice, nor drum with your fingers or feet. 3. Speak not when others speak, sit not when others stand, and walk not when others stop. 4.

Historical Reads: Bonaparte the Bookworm

Over at Military History Now, author Shannon Selin talks about Napoleon’s love for reading and his favourite books. To quote: According to his classmate (and later secretary) Louis Bourrienne, Napoleon read avidly from an early age. Whenever they had free time at the military school at Brienne: [Napoleon] would run to the library, where he

The Lady Mary Submits To Her Father

22 June 1536 was a black day for the Lady Mary, the only surviving child of Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. She finally submitted to her father’s request to accept him as the Supreme Head of the Church in England, and, even worse for the young girl, the invalidity of her

Hair Fashions In Ancient Rome

(C) Shakko The 1816 edition of the Belle Assemblee featured a very interesting article about the headdresses of some of most famous women in ancient Rome, and how hair fashions changed throughout the centuries. Here it is: FAUSTINA, WIFE OF THE EMPEROR ANTONINUSShe knew how to arrange her hair in the most elegant manner, without

Favours Refused

The Austrian Emperor Joseph II, Marie Antoinette’s brother, received a lot of petitions and requests for favours. But he only granted them when he thought the men (or women) were worth them. Here are two examples to favours he refused to two mothers and their sons: Madam, I do not think that it is amongst

The Life Of Female Pirate Mary Read

One of the most famous female pirates of all time, Mary Read was born in 1691 in England, the illegitimate daughter of a captain’s widow. She had a legitimate brother from her mother’s marriage. When he died, worried about how to make ends meet, her mother dressed Mary as a boy so the family could

George Stubbs’ Horse Portraits

Whistlejacket Aristocrats didn’t just commission portraits of themselves and their families. They also commissioned portraits of their beloved horses. In the 18th century, the man for the job was George Stubbs, a Liverpudlian painter with a fondness for these magnificent animals, which he perfectly captured in his pictures. Here are a few examples: Bay Horse