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Tag: history

Life In The Temple Prison

The Temple had been, as its name imported, the fortress and palace of the Knights Templars, and, having been erected by them in the palmy days of their wealth and magnificence, contained spacious apartments, and extensive gardens protected from intrusion by a lofty wall, which surrounded the whole. It was not, unfit for, nor unaccustomed

The Life Of Female Pirate Mary Read

One of the most famous female pirates of all time, Mary Read was born in 1691 in England, the illegitimate daughter of a captain’s widow. She had a legitimate brother from her mother’s marriage. When he died, worried about how to make ends meet, her mother dressed Mary as a boy so the family could

Favours Refused

The Austrian Emperor Joseph II, Marie Antoinette’s brother, received a lot of petitions and requests for favours. But he only granted them when he thought the men (or women) were worth them. Here are two examples to favours he refused to two mothers and their sons: Madam, I do not think that it is amongst

The Lady Mary Submits To Her Father

22 June 1536 was a black day for the Lady Mary, the only surviving child of Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. She finally submitted to her father’s request to accept him as the Supreme Head of the Church in England, and, even worse for the young girl, the invalidity of her

Historical Reads: Bonaparte the Bookworm

Over at Military History Now, author Shannon Selin talks about Napoleon’s love for reading and his favourite books. To quote: According to his classmate (and later secretary) Louis Bourrienne, Napoleon read avidly from an early age. Whenever they had free time at the military school at Brienne: [Napoleon] would run to the library, where he

Dorothea Erxleben, The First Female Doctor In Germany

Born in Quedlinburg in 1715, Dorothea Christiane Erxleben née Leporin was the first female doctor in Germany. It’s an achievement that wouldn’t have been possible without the support of her dad. Unlike most men of his time, Christian Leporin, a doctor himself, disagreed with the custom of letting women languish at home. If they showed

The Short Life Of Anne Leighton

In late 1591, Elizabeth Knollys, a descendant of the Boleyns, and her husband, professional soldier Sir Thomas Leighton, welcomed a daughter into the world and their family. They named her Anne, and gave her an education befitting her status. The girl was taught sewing, housekeeping, and all the skills needed to manage a Tudor household.

A Negligent Duchess

When, in April 1776, English author Fanny Burney met Georgiana, the Duchess of Devonshire, at the park, she wasn’t too impressed. Here’s what she wrote to Samuel Crisp: Mr. Burney, Hetty and I took a walk in the Park on Sunday morning, where, among others, we saw the young and handsome Duchess of Devonshire, walking