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Tag: tudors

Book Reviews: The Rise Of Thomas Cromwell & Billie Holiday The Musician And The Myth

Hello everyone, here are today’s reviews. Enjoy: The Rise of Thomas Cromwell: Power and Politics in the Reign of Henry VIII, 1485-1534 by Michael Everett Thomas Cromwell is often portrayed, both by historians, novelists, and film makers, as a Machiavellian politician and revolutionary evangelical who rose to power by masterminding Henry VIII’s split with Rome.

The Lady Mary Submits To Her Father

22 June 1536 was a black day for the Lady Mary, the only surviving child of Henry VIII and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. She finally submitted to her father’s request to accept him as the Supreme Head of the Church in England, and, even worse for the young girl, the invalidity of her

Historical Reads: Anne Boleyn and Bloody Mary

Claire Ridgway, over at The Anne Boleyn Files, takes a close look at the relationship between Anne Boleyn and her step-daughter Mary. To quote: There is evidence that Anne did try and forge a relationship with the defiant Mary. On one occasion in 1534, she visited Elizabeth’s household by herself and asked to see Mary.

Eustace Chapuys

Ambassadors to foreign courts are rarely remembered, but the name Eustace Chapuys is familiar to any lover of Tudor history. A champion of Catherine of Aragon and her daughter Mary, Chapuys has left behind him lots of letters and dispatches about one of the most tumultuous periods of English history. Although often easily dismissed as

Lady Margaret Beaufort

“She was a gentlewoman, a scholar, and a saint, and after having been three times married, she took a vow of celibacy. What more could be expected of any woman?” In The White Queen, the BBC show inspired by Philippa Gregory’s novel, Margaret Beaufort was portrayed as a religious nutcase. But while very pious, the

4 Tudor Blogs You Must Follow

The Tudors are one of the most fascinating dynasties in the history of England, if not Europe, and their popularity seems only to increase as time goes on. So, it’s no surprise that, in recent years, a plethora of blogs about the Tudors have sprung up left, right, and center. A lot of them, sadly,